sporky_rat: A ram clymant argent (gleann abhann)
[personal profile] sporky_rat
I sewed myself an apron dress in three hours yesterday. I felt very pleased with myself.

images below, fair warning! )

I'm very proud of myself. Three hours from pulling out the fabric to hanging it up.
holyschist: Icon of a pomegranate split open to show sees (food)
[personal profile] holyschist
ETA: For the purpose of this question, "pinking" refers to small straight slits/cuts in the fabric, as for example in the doublet described in this dress diary. I have typically seen these described as pinks on 16th century clothing, but it might be simpler to think of them as very small slashes.

I have some general questions about pinking silk, with regards to 16th century clothing.

Most of the pinking I would like to do would involve 1/2" - 1" pinks, typically on dupioni or taffeta (eventually I might do a project with duchess satin, but not in the near future). I've come across some references to special "pinking chisels," but the only reference to someone who actually sells them that I can find is Green Man Forge. Their website (http://www.greenmanforge.com/) does not seem to exist.

Does anyone know where one could get "pinking chisels"? What kind of chisel or other tools do you use for pinking?

Currently I'm working on a project which will not be densely pinked, but where the pinks will be about 2" long (heading into "slash" territory?). Would this be easiest to do with an x-acto or utility knife (or possibly scissors) or is it better to get a 2" chisel?
holyschist: Image of a medieval crocodile from Herodotus, eating a person, with the caption "om nom nom" (Default)
[personal profile] holyschist
I am working on a Sekrit Project (more details later, I am sure!). Phase I involves collecting images of women's clothing in England, c. 1490-1630 (I'm keeping track of a few other paintings I especially like--Spanish and Italian--too, but not actively looking for those right now).

What I have so far is in this post. I'm looking for all social classes, but mostly aimed at upper middle class to nobility. While I've got some portraits of Elizabeth I in there, I'm more interested in gowns that would be, uh, more practical to make, e.g. not covered in solid beadwork that would make my eyes cross to figure out the pattern (embroidery is okay, for purposes of my Cunning Plan) and not made out of impossible-to-find-or-imitate-in-miniature fabric.

Right now I have some gaps in portraiture where I couldn't think of any (or many) favorites readily:

1490s
1500s
1600s
1610s
1620s

Do you guys have any favorite portraits from those decades in England? Or favorites from other decades I haven't included in that post?
princess: (crown)
[personal profile] princess
So I'm still enjoying piling hurt on myself, and I've decided that what I need to do to get motivated about the green monstrosity is add another layer of complexity. To that end I am looking for some good instructions to draft a doublet-esque style bodice (such as this portrait of Maria de Medici by Allori). I don't want to use a commercial pattern, but am rather trying to figure out how to do it on my own.

Thanks ahead of time.

Pennsic!

Jul. 31st, 2010 01:12 am
melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
[personal profile] melannen
I am going to Pennsic War! Is anybody else going? Actually I'm leaving um, later this morning, after sleep and loading of car, but I will be checking internet at least once before Friday, so I would love to hear about any other DW people coming!

(I will be at Settmore Swamp, building a tower.)

...The reason I put off making this post until the absolute last minute is that I knew I said I'd post photos of me in the wedding garb, and I kept putting that off.

I didn't get the doublet/binder or panes done, and not as much embroidery and trim as I wanted (that will be worked on at Pennsic) but overall it came out quite well, if not nearly as impressive as most of the rest of the wedding party. :D

I forget to get any pictures of me with my camera, and since I haven't asked consent to post anybody else in the official wedding pictures, you get two random shots of me on the dance floor from somebody else's camera.

Two mid-sized pictures of me in men's court garb from 'The Tudor Tailor' )
princess: A gold ring in the shape of a crown. (princess ring)
[personal profile] princess
If anyone knew of someplace I could find a higher resolution image of this painting: http://realmofvenus.renaissanceitaly.net/wardrobe/Lady1535.JPG

I would seriously owe them a debt of gratitude...

(I'm trying to figure out how the dress actually works before I put it on my list of maybe projects.)
melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
[personal profile] melannen
I'm going to be in an SCA wedding this summer (in about a month, so I really need to get moving!)

It's Tudor-ish, and since I'm a groomsman, I'm doing male garb, and since I'm not male, that means crossdressing. Which is yay, because crossdresing is fun. It also means the first time I've really worked with male period clothing beyond the very basics. I was given patterns from the book "The Tudor Tailor" (on which I now have Opinions), and I started with basic shirt and basic hosen. Since I decided to do them entirely hand-sewn, they're all I have so far - I'll be adding a green velvet and gold slashed jerkin, panes and a hat, and if I have time, a doublet and a bonnet.

Pictures of the shirt and hosen )

And now, a question I would like to put to the community: does anyone know of any SCA or period in general resources for crossplay/crossdressing, and specifically, for period-or-close-enough breast binders?

As the photos show, I don't need much, and if I fit the jerkin right I may not need anything, but I would like to be able to take the jerkin off and still more-or-less pass, and currently, that only works from a distance.

I found a muslin/linen binder pattern for Civil War re-enactors (by going on an adventure through the wayback machine, or I would link) but that's all I've found. If I don't find anything better I might try making a modified version of that one, but I was honestly quite surprised that I couldn't find anything SCA-ish on the topic when I looked online.

...I am also thinking of getting my hair cut in a period men's style (I've been thinking of getting it short anyway for the summer, so why not?) but another thing I was surprised to not find was resources for period men's hairstyles. Any advice or resources, or should I just start looking for hatless portraits?
alessandra_da_firenze: old-fashioned silver key on teal-ish background. (Default)
[personal profile] alessandra_da_firenze
Is now up in my journal. You can find it at: http://alessandra-da-firenze.dreamwidth.org/3402.html

I also got a notice that Amazon shipped my copy of Moda a Firenze today, so I may have it Friday, which would be the most awesome thing ever.

(If people would prefer I cross-post than leave links, let me know. I'm just trying to save bandwidth.)
alessandra_da_firenze: old-fashioned silver key on teal-ish background. (Default)
[personal profile] alessandra_da_firenze
(This is crossposted from my personal journal, but in the future I'll just be linking!)

I've been inspired by the burial dress of Eleanora di Toledo, although I won't be sticking strictly to it (I like my side lacing, for one thing).



fabric pr0n below the fold )
alessandra_da_firenze: old-fashioned silver key on teal-ish background. (Default)
[personal profile] alessandra_da_firenze
I was thinking about what I wanted to contribute to Three Weeks for DW, and wandering around this community, and I had a pretty brilliant idea! I have 12 yards of green silk (dupioni) that really wants to be a nice summery Florentine gown, and this here alternate journal (I'm normally [personal profile] princess) in which to chronicle the making of such a gown!

I've checked with our mod, and she says it's cool if I cross-post/link my entries, so I wanted to let everyone know that in just a few days you can, if you like, follow with me as I create a very green dress.

(There may be auxiliary Dress Diary as I help a friend create her first Florentine as well...)
holyschist: Image of a medieval crocodile from Herodotus, eating a person, with the caption "om nom nom" (Default)
[personal profile] holyschist
The Ottoman Empire was a Turkish state which lasted from 1299-1922, but the height of its power was in the 16th and 17th centuries.

This post is for providing resources on clothing, jewelry, hats, shoes, and other dress accessories in the 16th-17th century Ottoman Empire. These can be books, websites, museums with artifacts, or anything else you find helpful in making Ottoman clothing.

Please include the following in your subject line:

[type of resource] Topic

For example,

Subject: [book] Ottoman textiles and clothing

Comment: Ipek: The Crescent & the Rose: Imperial Ottoman Silks and Velvets, edited by Julian Raby & Alison Effeny.


If you like, please feel free to provide a summary as well.
holyschist: Image of a medieval crocodile from Herodotus, eating a person, with the caption "om nom nom" (Default)
[personal profile] holyschist
Am I correct in interpreting the Wadham shift (no 83, diagram on page 120) as being cut without a neck gusset, with an ungathered neck? The C shape of the neckhole seems more rounded than that on shifts with neck gussets, but I would still wonder how strong it would be at the point on the side of the neck without a gusset.

Cross-posted to [livejournal.com profile] sca_garb.
holyschist: Image of a medieval crocodile from Herodotus, eating a person, with the caption "om nom nom" (Default)
[personal profile] holyschist
I would like to make an Eleonora of Toledo-style 1540s Florentine gown, but I am deeply confused about baragoni. I haven't the first idea what shape they'd be before you put them together, much less how you put them together. Does anyone know of a good resource (article, dress diary...?) on how to make them? I've been searching and haven't yet found what I'm looking for.

Cross-posted to [livejournal.com profile] sca_garb.
holyschist: Image of a medieval crocodile from Herodotus, eating a person, with the caption "om nom nom" (Default)
[personal profile] holyschist
I finally finished my Elizabethan gown "in the Polish fashion" (closed with frogs)--I have been sewing on frogs a few at a time for months, since I hate it so.

It's loosely based on the Darnley Portrait and the Peace Portrait of Elizabeth I. It's my first attempt at a fitted Elizabethan gown and I'm still working out some problems with the doublet pattern, but overall I'm quite happy with it.

A photo! )

More commentary at my DW account (including what I'm going to fix next time around) and photos at my Flickr account.

I did make a necklace and girdle to go with it, but I couldn't find them before the event last Saturday (I finished attaching the frogs at 12:30 am the night before).

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